Tag Archives: Nnamdi Asomugha

Working on Sunday and Having to Watch the Eagles via Texts and Phone Apps

I got my first job when I was 16. I worked at Chuck E. Cheese as a game-room technician where I mostly slacked off, talked about how much I hated it there, and I even said the classic “this isn’t even going to be my career, so why take it seriously?” line. I did the same thing at Sears when I was 17 and 18.  I worked the majority of my weekends so I missed every football Sunday from 2006-2009.  It was then I got a job at a dialysis center and where I finally had Sundays off.  It was like a new world being introduced to me. To me the flowers petals were brighter on Sundays. My mom’s cooking smelled that much better and football was that much more enjoyable.  For the next two years I never missed a game, I was content and my mind’s highlight reel was full of plays and great moments during the season.  So why am I telling you all of this? Because all of that ended three weeks ago, I’m working weekends again.  It’s the reason I wasn’t able to give a post about week 2. I couldn’t get enough video to properly give an opinion. 

“Are you seeing what I’m seeing?” That’s the text I got from my friend John. It was 2:00 pm on Sunday afternoon and I was on my break. The Eagles were playing the Giants. I started getting frantic; I opened up one of my sports apps to check the score, it was 14-0. The eagles were losing. I was so confused; Michael Vick had about 80 yards and an interception. That’s as in-depth as I could get. I called my cousin Mario to see what was going on, but he didn’t answer. I texted John back and sat at the break table doing the “I-have-to-go-pee-but-I’ll-wait-until-the-last-minute” dance impatiently waiting for John to text me back.

“The Eagles playing that badly or is it a misleading 14-0?” I asked. Experience taught me how to ask questions in that sense.  I wanted to see if the Eagles were playing that terribly (which they’re good for about once or twice a year) or did a few bad bounces go against them (like a tipped pass that was intercepted).  John eased me for a little and told me that the Eagles were moving the ball against the Giants, but they just couldn’t get score when they got into the red-zone.  Besides the offensive line the red zone offense was an area of concern because they had no big wide receiver to just throw the ball up to which was why Plaxico was such a hot commodity in the off-season.

“Misleading, they are moving the ball, they just can’t score.”  My break ended and I looked at my phone for one last time before my break ended and would take secret trips to the back room to check the score.  I picked up and put down the same screwdriver five or six times before I said to myself that I had to switch up what I was doing. It was terrible too because in the back you were alone, but there wasn’t much service so sites that would take seconds to load were now taking minutes.  I was in limbo and I didn’t like it.  It’s like going out and forgetting your phone at home and the whole day you’re disconnected from the world.  That if there was a disaster happening outside you wouldn’t know about because you didn’t get a text saying to panic. “Score Mobile” opened finally and the score was 14-13, the Eagles were making a comeback and they were in the red zone.  I perched up behind a stack of boxes and kept hitting refresh, refresh, refresh, refresh, refresh, refresh.

Around 3:00 the Eagles took the lead 16-14 off of a field goal by Alex Henery.  I was excited because the offense was finally going and I thought this would be a turn-around even though it was still early in the season.  In one of the toughest divisions in football, a 2-1 start with a 1-0 division record three weeks into the season would be big.  But I didn’t know Vick was out with a broken right hand and that Mike Kafka was playing for the second straight week. I didn’t know that the Eagles were getting lit up through the middle of the field because their linebackers and safeties are horrible. I didn’t know that the Eagles changed the positions of their linebackers two weeks into the season; completely reshuffling the positions which could explain why Brandon Jacobs was so wide open on that touchdown. (I didn’t know that Brandon Jacobs was that wide open) I didn’t know that the other touchdown was a display of terrible tackling. I didn’t know that play made it look like Asante Samuel’s mantra of, “I don’t get paid to make tackles” was spreading throughout the locker room.  Nnamdi Asomugha played like his name was Dmitri Patterson and the stellar talent gene in the Matthews’ gene pool must’ve skipped Casey. 

The Eagles lost the game 29-16, sending shockwaves through my day and had my Cowboys-fan-friend BC talking about “how bout them Eagles?” Is this what happens when your offensive line coach becomes your defensive coordinator? You panic and reshuffle the defense?  The Eagles need to play man-coverage because they have the best cornerback core in the league, but Castillo played zone.  The tight end still kills the Eagles and it is so blatant and so common that if you closed your eyes and listen to the announcer say, it’s a pass, 85% of the time you can guess that it’s going to be thrown to the tight end.  Castillo looked desperate with changing the defense around like that and someone could argue that the pressure is getting to him.  Something needs to be done as soon as possible because there will be a lot of answers needed if the Eagles don’t make the playoffs this year.

Football is Baaaack

There has been a lot of action in the weeks since the lockout ended in July.  Starting with the absolute disrespect the league showed for its fans that further cemented the mantra that the NFL is “a business,” the league hasn’t mentioned its appreciation for its fans sticking through a lockout that was more senseless than Charlie Sheen’s comedy tour (Charlie Sheen reminds me of the friend who everyone thinks is funny and says that he could do stand up until they realize that without his friends he has just a bunch of inside jokes that get him booed off the stage.  I’m sure the Tiger Blood joke killed in between each snort of cocaine.).  Rosters were at 96 players and had to be trimmed down with no Organized Team Activities (OTA’s) and barely a training camp.  Free agents couldn’t be signed for days after the lockout ended and players on a team couldn’t be traded which had fans from different cities scrambling in confusion (the Eagles couldn’t trade Kevin Kolb right away and led to a slight worry that they would just keep him…again).  Or that when free agency had started there were mass and false reports where various free agents would end up. Adam Schefter, who should be called “The Weatherman Because He’s Right 30% of the Time,” speculated that the Eagles were the front-runners for defensive-end Ray Edwards and the Jets would land the prize of the off-season, Nnamdi Asomugha.  But Edwards went to the Falcons and Asomugha landed with the Eagles (who also got Jason Babin, the other Steve Smith, Ronnie Brown, Cullen Jenkins, and Antonio Rodgers-Cromartie). 

Then we had to endure the likes of Mark Schlereth, Merril Hoge, and Herm Edwards with their ass-kissing reviews of every team and every player they get questions about.  Then we had to hear about Tim Tebow and how much of a winner he was in college and “No matter how bad his mechanics are the man is a winner!” Bottom line, Tebow can’t play.  In the latter part of August, Fantasy Football drafts happened throughout the country reminding men that Sundays are about to get so much more enjoyable; that although birthdays are meaningless and Christmas is spent with your in-laws, at least you can hear Joe Buck every week (my favorite fantasy team name was from a guy who sells funeral plots. His team name was Grim-reaper, points for appropriateness.) For the final few days before the season, the NFL was dominated with Peyton Manning reports of whether or not he would play in week one. I watched SportsCenter multiple times today and Manning’s Neck competed with the KHL team plane crash (my prayers go out to the families of those lost) for most times it was preceded by “Developing Story” or “Breaking News” (it was 4-3 Peyton when I turned it off).  Peyton’s neck spread so far that it led to this conversation in my Sports Journalism class today.

New York Giants Fan: Is Peyton playing this week?

Me: I’m not sure, they said he’s doubtful.
New York Jets Fan: I don’t think he’ll play.

Me: *Nods in agreement*

NYGF: Damn, well I drafted him sixth overall in my one fantasy league.

Me: Yeah, I was thinki…wait, what? YOU PICKED HIM SIXTH OVERALL?!

NYJF: *Laughing*

NYGF: Yeah, Vick went one and Brady went five and I don’t like Aaron Rodgers.

Me: *Passes Out*

And still, with all of that, all I have to say is, it’s good to be back.

Glory Hallelujah! The Philadelphia Eagles ARE Contenders!

(Full analysis of the additions to the Eagles are upcoming, but they are so active right now, it would be silly to make one now.)

First, stop with the Miami Heat comparisons. If they were EL HEAT Tom Brady, Adrian Peterson, and Andre Johnson would’ve set up their contracts so they could’ve been free agents and taken their talents to South Philadelphia.  I also don’t like the whole “Dream Team” nickname because the Philadelphia Eagles still have holes they need to fill and problems they need to address (more on that in a bit). And as far as Rob Ryan’s comments on the Eagles, it’s just another reason for me to hate the Cowboys.  (Seriously, I hate them.  They’re like Yankees fans.  They live in Scranton, Pennsylvania and don’t like sports until they see how many championships the Cowboys won. Then they’re the biggest die-hard fans ever, but will never visit Cowboy Stadium.  Stop, you’re an embarrassment to your region and a front-running-fraudulent-counterfeit-fake-pseudo-false fan.) The only reason Ryan even got attention for that is his cooler and better coach brother Rex.  Did you know who Rob Ryan was until Rex stepped on the scene? Probably not. Let Cullen Jenkins’ tweet sum up everything about Rob Ryan. Thank you for letting me vent.

It’s been 60 years since the Eagles last championship and seven years since their last trip to the Super Bowl. You know the Super Bowl where Number 5 was caught throwing up in the huddle during the last minute drive against the New England Patriots.  The final score ended up being 24-21 and the Eagles didn’t sniff the Super Bowl for four years until they lost to the Arizona Cardinals in the NFC Championship game in 2008. Philadelphia has had to endure the yelling and pundit hatred towards the city because of their lack of love for McNabb and their demeanor overall.  Notice no matter how well the Eagles do in free agency, no one says anything nice about the city.  You’ll never hear Darryl “Moose” Johnston say how “Great of a city Philadelphia is to play in.”  Since that 2008 season, it’s been two first round knockouts, one to the Dallas Cowboys and the other to Green Bay Packers, a quarterback change that resurrected Michael Vick’s career, and a full revolution on the offensive and defensive side.  It’s the first year since the 2004 season that the Eagles are serious contenders for the Super Bowl. And in a weaker NFC, who can stop them?

If someone was to ask me five years ago that the Philadelphia Eagles were going to be major players in a free agency year and actually committed to their plan of going “all-in” I would’ve said you’re crazy.  Eagles owner, Jeffrey Lurie, who has overpaid free agents (Jason Peters), is notoriously cheap on players who are on the wrong side of 30.  However this year, their three biggest pick-ups (Cullen Jenkins, Jason Babin, and Nnamdi Asomugha) are all over 30.  Those three signings fixed the defensive line and officially blocked off whatever side of the field Asomugha plays.  (Within in the next week I’ll have a post on why Asomugha is BETTER than Darrelle Revis.) They traded their best asset in Kevin Kolb for a second round pick and Dominique Rogers-Cromartie, a younger and more physical coverage cornerback, a change from Asante Samuel who jumps routes, but gets beat by the double move a lot.  The reason for abandoning one of the best coverage corners in the NFL; to help out the defensive line.  The longer receivers are covered, the easier it makes it on the defensive line to break through and get to the quarterback. It’s going to be tough to matchup with the Eagles this year. However, it’s not all good.  Casey Matthews, a fourth-round pick out of Oregon, is their starting middle linebacker, but he’s not ready yet and the Eagles could use a safety.  But as active as the Eagles are in free agency, I have to wait to analyze how they’ll match up against other teams.

The Eagles offense is going to put up points. They put up a franchise record 27.4 points per game last year and only have improved their offense. They drafted an offensive guard in Danny Watkins and are on their way to fixing the problems that had them knocked out last year.  They have taken steps to improve their defense and on paper it looks like they have done a great job.  But there are still more holes to fill so Eagles fans don’t jump ahead yet. Just enjoy the ride for now. More to come later